Friday, February 14, 2014

WOGE #426 update 3

Thanks to a hint from Ole (and to Luis asking for the hint) I was able to solve the somewhat challenging WOGE 425. I was already thinking of Scandinavia because of the deep shadows seen even in a summertime picture. In search of the green beach I started looking at areas with copper deposits. I found scenery in Norway that was similar enough to encourage me to keep looking there, and in a few more minutes I found the Gusdal olivine pit. Ole made sure the port facilities were just off the edge of the image so that it would not be too easy to find.

For the next edition I have something green and mountainous as well:

I suspect that if no one recognizes this mountain immediately, then it will be quite hard to find.  There will be no Schott rule this time, and I have a series of additional images to use as hints.  I will release one every few days until someone wins.  To win, just tell us the coordinates of the location and some information about the geology.  Finding the geology of this spot was very difficult for me, so I will give some suggestions. First, look at all the pictures, since some of them have good views of rock formations. Next, go to the geological agency for this country and you should be able to download a geologic map of the local area with enough detail to tell us how the mountain formed. For more rules, hints, and the history of WOGE, look at Felix Bossert's blog.

It has been four days, so I will start sharing the hint images:
Time for a little more help.  This is not actually a close-up of our location.  It is a mountainside about fifteen kilometers away:
Maybe a view of the larger area will help:


Saturday, December 28, 2013

WOGE 419

For his WOGE #418 Kubilay took us to an area with very interesting geology and also a long human human history.  When I saw the sharp contrast between the mountains and the plain, I guessed that this area might be somewhat near a coastline.  The irregular fields suggested Europe or Asia, so I started looking in the most logical place: Turkey.  Finding this area near Salihli only took a few minutes, but tracking down information about the geology took a bit longer.

For the next edition, I present a (hopefully) easy challenge:
Be the first to give the coordinates and tell us something about the geology, and you win the privilege of hosting the next WOGE.  For more details about the contest check out Felix Bossert's blog. The Schott rule is not in effect this time.  My Internet service has been very unreliable lately, so if someone posts the correct location and I have not replied within a day or so, any other regular player may confirm the win so that the game can continue.  Have fun searching!

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

WOGE #401

After watching other players rapidly solve some very interesting challenges during the last month, I decided to try again with Brian's WOGE 400.  I saw that this was obviously a volcano located in an arid region of the northern hemisphere, yet there were farmland and large lakes nearby.  I loaded my Google Earth volcano placemarks (available here) and looked around in Mexico, then moved over to the middle east and quickly found Nemrut volcano.  As Brian's post suggests, this is a location with both a rich history geologically and an interesting human story.

For the next edition of WOGE, I will keep things arid.  This location is not famous, but the climate makes it possible to see the underlying geology very clearly. 
 Be the first to post a comment with the coordinates and a simple description of the geology seen (in this case what kinds of rocks) and you win the privilege of hosting the next WOGE.  If finding information about the geology is difficult, try doing a search for "geologic map of (country)" or the equivalent in the local language.  No Schott rule will be in effect this time. Visit Felix's blog for an explanation of that, as well as other rules and hints.


Sunday, August 4, 2013

WOGE #392

Rob gave us a very interesting challenge with WOGE #391. The hint he gave (to focus on the white area in the middle) was the key for me to find the Orakei Korako geothermal area. I guessed that this was a geothermal feature of some kind, and since we were in the southern hemisphere I thought immediately of New Zealand.  After that, it was only a matter of finding a few minutes to search.

For the next edition of WOGE, I will use an area that I have been saving for some time.  My image also has a river flowing through it, but you won't find any geysers here...

As always, you can win by posting a comment with the coordinates and some information about what makes this area interesting geologically.  Since things always seem to move a little slower in the summer, there will be no Schott rule this time.  If you need to find out what that means, or want to learn more about the game, check out Felix's WOGE blog.  Have fun searching!


Saturday, November 17, 2012

WOGE 364

A look at the information that Max provides on his blog gave me the hint I needed to narrow down my search for his WOGE 363.  I found that the amazing Majlis al Jinn cave was concealed beneath the inconspicuous holes near the center of his image.

It seems fair to let others use the same approach...  Of course, the information on this blog is all related to locations I've used on WOGE before, so it might be helpful to know that my very first WOGE entry is posted here. WOGE #364 is the fifth in a series.
This is meant to be simple, so only the coordinates and a basic explanation of the geologic process are required to win.  The Schott Rule is in effect. If you don't know what that means, read these rules posted by Felix Bossert.  You may also find it useful to download his kmz file of past WOGE locations. Posting time below is UTC.

If you have been following the game, but don't have the time to search large areas, this is your chance!  With a few minutes and a little creative thinking you should be able to solve this one.  Once you get close enough, everything will become clear.

Sunday, July 29, 2012

WOGE 352 Revised Again!

Thanks to several hints from Felix I was finally able to solve WOGE 351. The Dendi Caldera in Ethiopia seems like it would be an interesting place to visit.  I had already wasted a modest amount of time searching areas around the Mediterranean before I caught on to the second picture.  A Google image search for "round thatched huts" turned up a number of pictures from Ethiopia mixed with those from various tropical islands.  Once I began searching the right county it took just a few minutes to locate the lake in the image.  Maybe this will help me recover from the embarrassment of not recognizing Ron's WOGE 350 even though I had found the location when it was Peter's WOGE 304.

Now its time for WOGE 352.  Once you locate this area it should be relatively easy to find some good information about the geology.  As always, be the first person to post a comment with the coordinates of the location and some explanation of the processes or features that make it geologically interesting and you will  win the privilege of hosting the next challenge.  See Felix Bossert's blog for complete rules and hints. Since the game has been a little slow lately, the Schott rule is not in effect, and I will post a first hint in just a few days if necessary.  Have fun!
Here is the first hint.
Still looking?  Maybe a close-up view will help.
See the little thatched huts?  But it's not quite the same as in Felix's last edition.

Here is another hint:  According to the Global Volcanism Program the closest Holocene volcano is almost 2000 km from this location.

Maybe it will help if I double the view again.

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

WOGE 345 - Revised

After a few rather difficult (for me) challenges, I was relieved to see that WOGE 344 was something I could find easily.  Felix chose to show us the Vistula Spit, a beautiful stretch of shoreline near the southern end of the Baltic Sea.  The most important clue for me was the vegetation: it appeared to be a temperate forest rather than a tropical one, so the number of coastlines I needed to check was greatly reduced.

I had a great location in mind for my next WOGE win, but I have decided to put it on hold.  Instead, I will offer anyone who was busy searching for gracefully curved beaches the chance to continue doing so. As always, be the first person to post a comment with the coordinates of the image and a basic description of the geology, and you win the privilege of hosting the next WOGE. (See complete rules and search hints here.) Since Felix did not mention the Schott rule last time, I will not invoke it here either.  Have fun searching!
I welcome any feedback my fellow WOGE players would like to give on whether this almost identical search is a good idea or not.  If this edition is not solved in a few days I will give a slightly adjusted view so that the game can move on quickly to something else.

It has been a few days, so here is a larger view.